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Covering The Tendring District

We cover the entirety of Tendring, and here you’ll find
information on Tendring’s most sought after towns and villages.

BEAUMONT CUM MOZE

Beaumont-Cum-Moze is a village and parish in the Tendring hundred and union, 2 miles north of Thorpe, 14 miles east of Colchester station, 9½ miles south-west of Harwich, and 8 1/2 miles south-east of Manningtree. It is at the head of a large creek of the sea and has a wharf.

If you take a circular route from Thorpe-le-Soken passing through Landermere, Beaumont Quay and Beaumont-cum-Moze along a very pleasant stretch of the creek there are excellent views over the Walton Backwaters and Hamford Water.  At one time this area was regularly in use by Thames sailing barges. The famous remains of one of these craft (‘Rose’) can be seen at Beaumont Quay.   This quay, now disused, was built of stone recycled from the old London Bridge. You will also see an interesting row of cottages.

BRIGHTLINGSEA

Situated between Colchester and Clacton-on-Sea and on the mouth of the River Colne and Brightlingsea creek, Brightlingsea is a small coastal town in the Tendring District.

With a beach that’s perfect for family outings and for paddling and swimming, Brightlingsea is a fantastic destination if you want to explore and get away from the more popular and more crowded beaches of Clacton and Southend.

Take a walk along the Western Promenade and you’ll see Bateman’s Tower in the distance. This Grade II listed tower was built in 1883 by John Bateman and it’s believed to have been built to allow his daughter to recuperate. The tower is situated on the entrance to Brightlingsea Creek and is often mistaken for one of the Martello Towers that are dotted around the coast.

 

BRADFIELD

A pretty village found about 3 miles South East of Manningtree in the district of Tendring, Essex. If  you find yourself travelling from the village along the coastal roads to Mistley or Wrabness there are outstanding views over farmland and over the river Stour to the Suffolk coastline beyond. Housing stock here is quite varied ranging from smaller terraced and semi-detached homes through to more grand detached residences often found with field views. Critically though there is a good stock of bungalows found here and we often find that those searching for bungalows consider Bradfield as a destination as there are so few available in the older nearby town of Manningtree. The northern end of the village overlooks the Stour estuary and there is access to a beach at the coastline, this a beautiful area with established walks and enquestrian routes through rolling countryside.Bradfield has its own primary school, village store and sub post office and two locally run public houses. In the centre of the village you will find the village hall and there’s also a recreation ground found towards the northern end of the village.

BRANTHAM

Beaumont-Cum-Moze is a village and parish in the Tendring hundred and union, 2 miles north of Thorpe, 14 miles east of Colchester station, 9½ miles south-west of Harwich, and 8 1/2 miles south-east of Manningtree. It is at the head of a large creek of the sea and has a wharf.

If you take a circular route from Thorpe-le-Soken passing through Landermere, Beaumont Quay and Beaumont-cum-Moze along a very pleasant stretch of the creek there are excellent views over the Walton Backwaters and Hamford Water.  At one time this area was regularly in use by Thames sailing barges. The famous remains of one of these craft (‘Rose’) can be seen at Beaumont Quay.   This quay, now disused, was built of stone recycled from the old London Bridge. You will also see an interesting row of cottages.

DEDHAM

Dedham is a picturesque village nestled in the heart of the Dedham Vale, an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, located in the North of the county, straddling the River Stour into Suffolk.

It’s quaint High Street has an abundance of independent shops, cosy pubs and quintessential tearooms, including the famous Wilkin and Sons tearoom, the Essex Rose, perfect for some light refreshments or a delicious cream tea. Admire the Georgian architecture and timber framed buildings as you wander down the High Street. At the end you will find the Dedham Arts and Crafts Centre, in an historic converted church. The Centre houses many art treasures all carefully crafted by local artisans.

DOVERCOURT

Dovercourt bay is a tranquil seaside resort, with sand and shingle beaches, near the historic town of harwich. there are plenty of facilities on the promenade, including a skate park and boating lake, and it lies within easy reach of hemford water national nature reserve, known for its resident seals.The bay is home to two lighthouses, which were used to aid shipping around Britain. The unique lighthouses were restored in 1985-1988 by the high steward’s lighthouse appeal. Dovercourt Bay is a superb stretch of sandy beach and has a ‘blue flag’ beach award. With a promenade that stretches for miles, walking, cycling and water based activities can all be enjoyed. There are also spectacular views of Felixstowe as well as the Harwich and Languard Forts. The town centre itself is home to a number of historic and character buildings which also reflects the town’s rich past. The high street is not dominated by chain retailers, rather you will discover a great selection of independent, family run businesses and shops which include specialist food, gifts, crafts, beauty, clothing, footwear, florist and electrical goods.

 

GREAT BENTLEY

Most famous for the largest village green in England (approximately 43 acres), Great bentley is one of the Tendring District’s most sought after addresses found 7 miles to the East of Colchester. Apart from the village itself, the wider Parish is made up of the hamlet of Aingers Green, Holly Bush Hill and part of Flag Hill on the way to St. Osyth. There are many appealing factors about Great Bentley as a place to live and the the village has won Village of the Year (2000) and  more recently Essex Village of the Year and Best Kept Village competition.

The Green enables the village to cater for a wide-ranging schedule of community events for all ages and interests such as a carnival, village show, weekend football and the green also incorporates the Cricket pitch for the local Cricket Club.

GREAT OAKLEY

Great Oakley lies to the South West of neighbouring village Little Oakley on the B1414 connecting Thorpe-le-Soken to Harwich. The village lies 15.5 miles to the East of Colchester within close proximity of Hamford Water Nature Reserve (2.5miles), blue flag beach at Dovercourt (5.0 miles) and the picturesque Stour Estuary incorporating the small  historic town of Manningtree (8.9 miles). Mainline train links to London Liverpool Street and Stratford are found at Manningtree and Thorpe-le-Soken (4.7 miles) with the A120 (A12) being just 2.0 miles away. 

The village benefits from a primary school and award winning pre-school, private doctors surgery, village hall, small convenience store and community owned public house ‘The Maybush’ found just off the square in the oldest part of the village surrounded by many period and Grade II listed properties.

HARWICH

The attractive old town was built on a grid pattern, in the 13th century, by the Earl of Norfolk, to exploit its strategic position at the mouth of the Stour/Orwell estuary. The famous seafarers Hawkins, Drake and Frobisher all sailed from Harwich during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I on various expeditions.

An enjoyable way to discover the historic town is to follow its Maritime Heritage Trail. From Ha’Penny Pier Visitor Centre on the Quay there are guided walking tours throughout the summer.  Start your walk at the Low Lighthouse Maritime Museum built in 1818 and Lifeboat Museum, where you can get aboard a lifeboat and end at the Barge Murals which overlook the site where Thames Sailing Barges were built up to 1930.

LAWFORD

Lawford Parish has grown rapidly to the boundaries of Manningtree and Lawford, Mistley and Manningtree are more and more often referred to as Manningtree.  As for housing, Lawford has been developed in more modern times predominantly from the 1930’s and 1960’s and more recently in the 2010’s to today. Typical of the 1960’s is the Lefley estate which is home to a range of mainly semi-detached houses and bungalows. Lawford Dale is a quick hop over the road from the train station and is an interesting development with many of the properties being built into the rising land from the river level. As you head up Cox’s hill you’ll find Summer’s Park, built by well renowned and well reputed local builders Rose. These are really attractive and well planned houses and plots in a mock-Victorian and Georgian style that compliment the older housing stock found in Manningtree. Continuing further you’ll approach Mistley Place which is a gated and pretty exclusive development of houses and appartments centred around sprawling and attractive open spaces.

LITTLE OAKLEY

Great Oakley lies to the South West of neighbouring village Little Oakley on the B1414 connecting Thorpe-le-Soken to Harwich. The village lies 15.5 miles to the East of Colchester within close proximity of Hamford Water Nature Reserve (2.5miles), blue flag beach at Dovercourt (5.0 miles) and the picturesque Stour Estuary incorporating the small  historic town of Manningtree (8.9 miles). Mainline train links to London Liverpool Street and Stratford are found at Manningtree and Thorpe-le-Soken (4.7 miles) with the A120 (A12) being just 2.0 miles away. 

The village benefits from a primary school and award winning pre-school, private doctors surgery, village hall, small convenience store and community owned public house ‘The Maybush’ found just off the square in the oldest part of the village surrounded by many period and Grade II listed properties.

MANNINGTREE

Manningtree itself is not short of picturesque scenery both natural and man-made, be that the rolling countryside walks through to Flatford Mill, the greensward along the shore of the stour looking out toward Suffolk or the High Street containing many period buildings with Georgian facades all protected within the local conservation area. There’s a little something for everyone here. Young families move here for the excellent schooling, both Primary and Secondary. Listed as one of the best places to live in 2019 we’re firmly on the radar for the commuter with a wealth of modern executive housing and Intercity train links back to London Liverpool Street and Stratford of under an hour. And, what a place to retire! Gorgeous surroundings and all the services that you’ll need within easy reach as you grow old. There’s no wonder that property prices here are prime. Manningtree is sought after from a wide demographic and far reaching geographical locations.

MISTLEY

The parish of Mistley is situated in the Tendring District of Northeast Essex beside the Stour estuary just to the West of Manningtree approximately 11 miles from Colchester. It is a pretty village with it’s own small ‘High Street’ lined predominently with Period and Georgian buildings.

Mistley is well served with rail links via Manningtree to London and by the Mayflower line to Harwich. As for notable history, the Witchfinder General, Matthew Hopkins, was said to have lived in the village from 1645-1647 supposedly owning the Mistley Inn.  He was buried a few hours after his death in the graveyard of the Church of St Mary the Virgin.  The original Georgian parish church built on this site in the classical style has now been demolished; all that is left on the site are the twin towers, Mistley Towers.

PARKESTON

Parkeston is known locally as “Spike Island” or “Cinder City”. The ‘Cinder City’ name was particularly appropriate given the large areas of marshland or saltings that were reclaimed, frequently using waste material from the railway activities.

There can be very few examples of a village created by a railway company to house the company’s workers for their very extensive railway and shipping services. The railway operation also included a locomotive shed and very extensive marine workshops to service the fleet of vessels based on the port, comprising up to a dozen ferries and cargo vessels at a peak.

RAMSEY

Ramsey is a village found to the East of Harwich and it’s parish includes Ramsey and Parkston on the B1352 road served by the close-by A120. The Village of Ramsey stretches from the sea to the banks of the River Stour and stands astride both of the main roads into Harwich so that all travellers by road or rail to or from the port pass by it. Standing aloft upon the Hill at Ramsey and visible to the naked eye from much of the surrounding area is Ramsey Windmill. Originally built in Woodbridge, Suffolk the mill was moved to Ramsey in 1842 by Henry Collins, millwright of Woodbridge and was working through to the Second World War. Members of the Suffolk Mills Group assisted with restoration work on Ramsey Windmill between 1974 and 1978. Grade II listed and now privately owned standing adjacent to a Georgian Farmhouse the Windmill is a post mill with a three story roundhouse, winded by a roof mounted fantail (blown off in 1939!) and has four double Patent sails. 

THORPE-LE-SOKEN

Thorpe-le-Soken’s history can be traced back to Saxon times. There has been a manor house at Thorpe since about 1150.  Thorpe Hall was owned originally by the Leake family,  Later became the home of Viscount Bing of Vimy and his wife who relandscaped the gardens.  Today it has evolved into Lifehouse & Spa Hotel retaining the ‘spiritual home’ theme and the beautiful gardens

Rolph C of E Primary School is in the High Street  and the Thorpe Campus of Tendring Technology College (Years 7, 8 and 9) is in Landermere Road.

The village is served by Thorpe-le-Soken Railway Station.  It hosts several pubs, shops and restaurants

WIX

Wix is a village in North East Essex.

Formerly an important crossroads on the route to Harwich, it has now been bypassed by the A120.

The name is the plural of the Old English.

There is one pub, The Waggon at Wix, a post office and general stores in Colchester Road, the Equestrian Centre in Clacton Road and Anglian Timber.

Also home to Wix Equestrian Centre first established in 1987 – started out as a small family-run business, now has two indoor show arenas.

WRABNESS

Explore Wrabness and it’s nature reserve. Found on the Northern boundary of our peninsuar on the shores of the Stour estuary is the sprawling village of Wrabness. Whilst semi-rural in nature and modest in size Wrabness still retains its railway station on the ‘Mayflower Line’ connecting Harwich to Manningtree to Colchester and beyond.

Owned and manged by the Essex Wildlife Trust, Wrabness local nature reserve spans 52 acres of mature woodland, wild fields, protected marsh and grassland with a small sandy beach found on the Stour to the North. This is a rambler’s and a twitcher’s delight as the patient birdwatcher can observe owls, yellowhammers, whitethroats, turtle dove, song thrush, nightingales
and bullfinches. Wild plants such as corn mint, hairy buttercup, sea aster and
ox-eye daisy flourish here.